Personnel Management Objectives-1

January 13, 2009

Today we continue out talk on personnel management objectives. We have already discussed four objectives in our last post. Today we will discuss other two objectives.

 

5. To recognise and satisfy individual needs and group goals by offering and adequate and equitable remuneration, economic and social security in the form of monetary disability, death, unemployment etc. With adequate compensation and security, employees work willingly and cooperate to achieve an organisation’s goals.

 

6. To maintain high morale and better human relations inside an organisation by sustaining and improving the conditions so that employees may stick to their hob for a longer period.

 

Considering these objectives, you will perhaps, agree that the objectives are in the best interests of all those to whom management is responsible i.e. owners of enterprise, the community, the consumers of its goods and services, and members of the organisation itself, including groups who may belong to unions. In our next post we will discuss that why personnel manager of any organization need to create some conditions and how?


Personnel Management Objectives

January 5, 2009

The objectives of Personnel Management are given below:

1. To achieve an effective utilization of human resources for the achievement of organization goals. Term life insurance rates provider need to manage all his agents in effective way to achievement organization goals.

 

2. To establish and maintain an adequate organizational structure and a desirable working relationship among all the members of an organization by dividing the organizational tasks into functions, positions, jobs and by defining the responsibility, accountability, authority for each job and its relation with other jobs/personnel in the organization. For example, a blinds company who is selling vertical blinds and roman shades blinds online, for them coordination of different departments is must. Inter company relation and intra company relation management is important part of personnel management.

 

3. To secure the integration of the individuals and groups with the organization by reconciling individual/group goals with those of an organization in such a manner that the employees feel a sense of involvement, commitment and loyalty towards it. The absence of this integration will allow development of frictions, personal jealousies and rivalries, prejudices, personnel conflicts, cliques, factions, favoritism and nepotism. These will produce inefficiency and result in failure of the organization.

 

4. To generate maximum development of individuals/groups within an organization by providing opportunities for advancement to employees through training and job education or by offering transfers or by providing retraining facilities. For example, a term life insurance rates providing company, for management they need to keep weekly target for their agents in such a way that term life insurance agents can achieve it easily.


Functions and operations of a personnel office

December 31, 2008

An organization is formed for the fulfillment of certain objectives like earning a desired rate of profit on investment, exploitation of certain natural resources, development of a given geographical area, and supplying to the public some essential goods or services. Machines, materials, money and all other non-human resources are the tools and aids that man uses to achieve his tasks. Thus, a proper selection of men is very much important for management of an organization. For example, Blinds Company who are sending their personnel for installation of roller shades and woven wood shades, need to be a proper person with technical knowledge as well as as individual too. 

 

However this is the most difficult of all the management tasks in an organization. Some people also say that ‘management’ means ‘managing managing men tactfully’. One often comes into contact with the personnel department of one’s office, for example, for selection, placement, training, discipline, grievance handling, wage administration, dismissal, etc. However, there are certain aspects of the work of a personnel department which may not be very obvious. When a company is doing term life insurance business online or when they have paperless officer, personal management may not be very obvious.

 

CHARACTERISTICS OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENTPersonnel Management is known by various names. These are Personnel Administration, Labor Management, Industrial Relations, Employee Relations, Manpower Management, etc. The manager who performs this function is also, likewise, called by various names, like Personnel Manager, Employee Relations Manager, Industrial Relations Manager, Labour Relations Manager, Labour Officer, Labour Welfare Officer, Welfare Officer, Personnel Officer, Employee Relations Officer, and Industrial Relations Officer.


Human Resource Systems

December 30, 2008

If organization has got systems to punish but not to reward people, the former too become defunct over a period of time because a manager who does not have the power to reward forfeits his right to punish, at least in course of time.

 

Organizations vary in regard to the degree to which they provide careers to their employees, encourage participation, promote from within and orient their systems toward collective, group based performance. Many will have a mixture of the two choices mentioned above. In some cases, the system is a matter of choice and is meant to support a cultural orientation towards a cooperative rather than competitive climate. But most organizations covered by Peter and Waterman (included in Fortune USA 500 companies) seem to stress on “challenging and meaningful work” with stress on participation, upward mobility and group performance. In the Indian context social compatibility becomes a relevant issue.

 

We should also be careful in generalizing and in being prescriptive. For example, the concept of life-long employment and preference to employees’ children in employment which seem to work well in the case of Tata Steel proved to be disastrous in those of some other companies. Hence the need to be wary about the organizational context regarding strategic choices in human resource systems.


Formal Structure and Human Resource Systems

December 26, 2008

Organizations operate in an ever changing environment. Hence there is need for changing assumptions about organization structures also. Modern organizations involving high technology and educated workforce require relatively flat and not pyramidical structures. There is need for evolving new approaches and strategies in manpower and career planning systems and building them into organization planning. This is a major challenge and opportunity for personnel in the changing organizational context. Even online business companies dealing with blinds, roller shades, woven wood shades needs to have human resources systems.

 

Human Resource Systems

People are recruited and developed to do jobs defined by the organization’s formal structure; their performance must be monitored and rewards allocated to maintain productivity.

 

An analysis of the human resource system of large companies should yield information about what assumptions the designers of those systems hold about people. Are they people of McGregor’s Theory X type or Maslow’s self-motivators seeking self-actualization? There may be problems in articulating an individual manager’s beliefs, but one can deduce the real beliefs from the control systems they use. And since they are usually designed on an ad hoc piece-meal basis, one can find many incongruities and incompatibilities. For term life insurance agency also need to have human resource systems to manage their life insurance agents. If and organization has got systems to punish but not to reward people, the former too become defunct over a period of time because a manager who does not have the power to reward forfeits his right to punish, at least in course of time.


Formal Structure

December 24, 2008

People and tasks are organized to implement the organization’s strategy. The organization’s formal structure includes its systems of financial and operating control systems. The number of levels between the operator at the lowest rung and the chief executive at the highest rung in the hierarchy has increased from 5 to 15 in the last fifteen years or so. We have more people at the middle level to supervise and get work done than those who do the work. Mangers by themselves do not produce. Promotion policies designed to make individual aspirations are causing more problems in achieving organizational purposes.

 

Organizations need three levels: operating, managerial and strategic. At the operational level, the day-to-day management of the organization is carried out. The managerial level focuses on the processes by which the organization obtains and allocates the resources needed to carry out its strategy and objectives. The strategic level deals with policy formulation and overall goal setting; its objective is to position the organization in the best possible way to deal effectively with its environment. The three levels do not operate in a top-down system, but provide feedback loops for upward communication.

 

As mentioned above, in most Indian organizations the levels of managerial activity have been increased largely to accommodate the aspirations for promotions that individual employees have. In the process, employees are promoted, jobs are downgraded and responsibility is blurred.


Strategy and Planning

December 17, 2008

We will continue our talk on some standards for Strategy and Planning for organization. Personnel should use information about their performance to gain recognition and acceptance. Numbers are important because words are imprecise. The role of personnel in strategic planning would be substantial if a personnel manager’s results guide has some of the following examples as performance standards:

  1. Employee costs per unit of production service shall be held at…..(base year) and indexed to……… as a percentage of fixed and semi-variable expenses.
  2. At least 66.6% of increased cost of improvements in the Long-term Agreement shall be met through improvement in employee productivity.
  3. During the next….years, these shall be a reduction of……..% in down time of plant and machinery………..% in the avoidable waste of materials and……..% in absenteeism beyond authorized leave.
  4. Ensure that 33.3% of saving arising out of the three factors above will be distributed to ensure improvement in the individual employee’s earnings. For example, when we plan to renovate house, we need to plan which type of blinds we are going to use, woven wood shades blinds or roller shades blinds or wood blinds only.
  5. An individual employee must move up ………grades in his work span of…….years through careful manpower and succession planning.
  6. At least 25% of vacancies in the managerial cadre shall be filled from amongst the lower job holders through appropriate training and development programmes.

ORGANISATIONAL CONTEXT-1

December 16, 2008

Personnel should adopt the language of business and relate its effectiveness in relation to the business objectives concerning output, profit, and contribution to society. Peers in other functions focus on income, assets, liabilities, sales, costs and profits while personnel continue to talk about feelings.  

 

The traits which characterize personnel function today are: 

·         It is largely a reactive service

·         Employees are viewed as adversaries, not as partners or stakeholders

·         Employees constitute an element of cost, not an asset 

 

There is need for a change it personnel perspective to develop common interests and common language. Peter F. Drucker observes that few factors are as important to the performance of an organization as measurement. And, especially in personnel, measurement is the weakest area. Personnel should know how to objectively measure their activities, to get over the subjectivity myth and overcome the values conflict.

 

Until this happens, personnel would mean many things to many people and respect for and recognition of personnel would remain a far cry. Personnel should use information about their performance to gain recognition and acceptance. Numbers are important because words are imprecise. The role of personnel in strategic planning would be substantial if a personnel manager’s results guide has some of the examples as performance standards which we discuss in next post.


ORGANISATIONAL CONTEXT-1

December 15, 2008

Managing in turbulent times requires organizations to raise basic questions as to their nature and purpose. Strategic management involves consideration of the following aspects:

·         Mission and Strategy

·         Formal Structure

·         Human Resource System

These three aspects are discussed there from the personnel management point of view.

 

Mission and Strategy 

An organization needs a reason for being i.e. mission, and a sense of direction as to how to carry it out i.e. strategy. Most of our organizations, particularly in the public sector, have multiple objectives. The loose definition of objectives and their plurality often provides an excuse to dilute accountability. The paucity of data on human resources often makes it difficult to include it in the process of strategy formulation. 

The macro-objective pf Gross National Product (GNP) an the standard of living and the micro-objective of Return on Investment (ROI) and quality of work life provide enormous opportunities for the personnel function to make significant contributions. Personnel should adopt the language of business and relate its effectiveness in relation to the business objectives concerning output, profit, and contribution to society. Peers in other functions focus on income, assets, liabilities, sales, costs and profits while personnel continue to talk about feelings.

blinds, roller shades, woven wood shades


Political-3

December 12, 2008

Today we continue our talk on political as part of environmental aspects. Nevertheless, technological changes have reduced the dependence on muscle power in manual jobs, and manual labour in clerical and other white collar occupations. The advent of modern technology has rendered work on the shop-floor and the office more alike. Job content and methods of production are changing.

 

Modifications occur in the size and composition of work groups. The network of social relations among employees is also affected. Secular shifts in consumption patterns and technological developments have displaced artisans such as weavers, potters, fishermen, washermen, etc. Technical training institutions began to impart training in skills such as carpentry and weaving which once used to be the exclusive domain of people belonging to certain castes.

 

In retrospect, these changes had the following effects on the individuals: the link between caste and occupation was broken, the skill of artisans which was more personal and manual was replaced with the skill of technicians which is more impersonal and mechanical; job performance depended more on dexterity in handling machines than exercising one’s skill or craft and thus individual’s pride in his contribution to final output, for which Indian artisans were renowned was reduced.


Political-1

December 10, 2008

Political independence and democratic forces have raised the expectations of our people. Compared to most other developing countries in Asia and Africa, the democratic institutions in India are more developed, strong and active. There is an increasing demand from our people for a greater degree of involvement and participations in matters that concern and affect them.

 

Government intervention to regulate employment relationship and organizational performance has been on the increase in pursuit of the ideals enshrined in our Constitution and the objectives of Five-year Plans.

 

We have had much progressive legislation since independence to regulate working conditions and employment relations, abolish bonded labor, check contract labour, ensure equal pay for equal work, guarantee minimum wages, provide social security, etc. We also some stringent legislations like Essential Services Maintenance Act (ESMA) and Maintenance of Internal Security Act (MISA), which trade unions and civil liberty organizations abhor.

 

Employers and unions are critical about much of the legislative framework because it does not enable them to function the way they want to, but seeks to control. Non-compliance of legislation is fairly widespread because ‘state ways’ alone cannot change ‘folkways’; besides, weaknesses in administering the laws and loopholes in the provisions have aggravated the situation.


Demographic and Socio-cultural

December 8, 2008

Demographic

Today we continue our talk and demographic as a part of environmental aspects and we are going to discuss on another aspects and which is Socio-cultural. The sex composition of workers has also been changing. Earlier, women were recruited mainly as labor in agriculture and related traditional industries like plantations, etc. Now they are increasingly occupying white collar and managerial positions. Etc. Now they are increasingly occupying white collar and managerial positions. Working women, especially in developing countries like ours, are beginning to resist discrimination against them by employers and sexual harassment at work place.

 

Socio-cultural

Hindu religion and culture does not teach people to be idle. It is enjoined that one should do one’s duty not in return or expectation of its fruit but because it is one’s dharma. High quality work without supervision over long hours, almost unrelated to its fruits in monetary terms, is done by the self-employed persons, e.g., craftsmen, fishermen, housewives, and employees of small unorganized units, in towns and villages. On the other hand, the question of lack of work culture or ethics is discussed largely in the context of large scale organized industry primarily in urban areas. Even in urban areas office interior is different than in rural areas. In urban areas offices are having vertical window blinds with roman shades or other shades. Which in rural areas, offices are having curtains.

 

roman shades, vertical blinds


Demographic-1

December 5, 2008

Over a period of time, the profile of employees, industrial workers in particular, has been changing. Labor is not restricted to certain castes and communities. Social mobility accounts for the emergence of a mixed industrial workforce. While in traditional industries this change is slow, one can notice it in relatively sophisticated industries such as engineering, oil refining and distribution, chemicals and petro-chemicals, machine-tools, etc. The background of the intermediate and lower cadres in the latter industries is overwhelmingly urban; their level of education is higher; they come from middle or lower middle classes. Moreover the old social barriers are breaking down. The old distaste among certain groups for manual work is gradually wearing off because the groups themselves have not retained their separate identity as of old and also because jobs are not wholly manual.

 

Higher skills and educational requirements expected of workers in modern factories and better wage levels have tended to blur further the traditional distinction between manual and non-manual workers. Employees are seeking and demanding parity in employee benefits among different categories and levels. The evolving social and political climate in the country also has its impact in shaping and expending these changes in the composition of workforce and their disposition towards work place.


EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT FOR PERSONNEL

December 2, 2008

Organizations are becoming large and complex, with the progressive industrialization and advent of new technologies. Over the years, government intervention in regulating organizational purposes and performance has increased. Social obligations, legal aspects and trade union pressures are actively shaping the environment. Here we shall consider some of the environmental trends in terms of five principal environmental aspects:

·         Economic

·         Demographic

·         Socio-cultural

·         Political

·         Technological

 

Economic

Low growth (3.5% long-term average), high rate of inflation (8.5%), and spreading unemployment have been principal sources of concern on the economic scene. To achieve full employment at a 2.4% growth in population, the number of jobs should rise by 3.9%. The International Labor Organization estimated that US $ 6250 is needed to create a new job in developing countries like ours. Capital-employment and capital-output ratios have declined progressively during the plan period. Inequities in income and wealth distribution have increased over the years, despite government initiatives to counter the same. Affirmative actions for the disadvantaged groups have brought in their wake new pressures for reservations in education and employment based on heredity, nativity, sex, caste and creed. Employment is sought and created in bulk of public sector units for its own sake. Together these factors and forces have put the nation on a reverse gear. The result has been the pursuit of backwardness.


Functioning of the System-2

November 29, 2008

We are talking about functionality of the System. We have already discussed on Building feedback and reinforcing mechanisms, Balancing quantitative and qualitative decisions and Balancing internal and external expertise. Today we are going to discuss on Planning for evolution of HRD.

 

d) Planning for the evolution of HRD: Various aspects of HRD can be introduced into the organization in stages, depending on its needs, size and level of sophistication. Some aspects may require a great deal of preparation. Rushing the introduction of an aspect of HRD may limit its effectiveness. Each stage should be planned carefully, with sequenced phases built one over the other. This may include: 

1.     Geographical phasing: introducing the system in a few parts of the organization and slowly spreading it to other parts. This may be necessary in a large or widely located organization.

2.     Vertical phasing: introducing the system at one or a few levels in the organization and expanding up or down gradually.

3.     Functional phasing: introducing one function or subsystem, followed by other functions. For example, introducing job specifications (identification of critical attributes of jobs) before introducing a complete potential-appraisal system.

4.     Sophistication phasing: introducing simple forms of subsystems, followed after some time by more sophisticated forms.

window blind store,  premierinns,  term life insurance


Functioning of the System-1

November 28, 2008

a) Building feedback and reinforcing mechanisms: The various subsystems within HRD should provide feedback to one another. Systematic feedback loops should be designed for this purpose. For example, performance and potential appraisals provide necessary information for training and OD, and OD programmes provide information for work redesign.

 

b) Balancing quantitative and qualitative decisions: Many aspects of HRD, such as performance and potential appraisals, are difficult to quantify. Of course attempts should be made to quantify many variables and to design computer storage of various types of information, but qualitative and insightful decisions are also necessary and desirable. For example, in considering people for promotions, quantitative data are necessary inputs, but other factors must also be taken into consideration. Thus a balance between the mechanical and the human factors in necessary.

 

c) Balancing internal and external expertise: A human resource development system requires the development of internal expertise and resources, specifically in content areas that are used frequently within the organization. For expertise that is required only occasionally, the use of external resources or consultants may be the most feasible. It is necessary to plan for an economical and workable balance between the two. It is preferable to use internal personnel to conduct training; however, an organization that user’s only in-house expertise may not benefit from new thinking in the field. On the other hand, a company that relies solely on external HRD help does not develop the internal resources that are necessary for effective functioning.


Structure of the System-1

November 24, 2008

The Structure of the HRD System depends on below functions:

1.     Establishing the identity of HRD

2.     Ensuring respectability for the function

3.     Balancing differentiation and integration

4.     Establishing linkage mechanisms

5.     Developing monitoring mechanisms

 

a)  Establishing the identity of HRD: It is important that the distinct identity of HRD be recognized. The person in charge of HRD should have responsibility for this function exclusively and should not be expected to do it in addition to any other function. Multiple responsibilities produce several kinds of conflict. This person should report directly to the chief executive of the organization.

b)  Ensuring respectability for the function: In many companies, the personnel function does not have much credibility because it is not perceived as a major function within the organization. It is necessary that HRD be instituted at a very high level in the organization and that the head of the HRD department be classified as a senior manager. Both the credibility and usefulness of HRD depend on this.

c)  Balancing differentiation and integration: The Human resource development function often includes personnel administration, human resource development and training, and industrial relations. These three functions have distinct identities and requirements and should be differentiated within the HRD department. One person may be responsible for OD, another for training, another for potential appraisal and assessment, etc. At the same time, these roles, should be integrated through a variety of mechanisms.

 

We will discuss with example on Balancing differentiation and integration, Establishing linkage mechanisms and Developing monitoring mechanisms in our next post.


Focus of the System

November 21, 2008

a)    Focus on enabling capabilities: The primary purpose of HRD is to help the organization to increase its “enabling” capabilities. These include development of human resources, development of organizational health, improvement of problem solving capabilities, development of diagnostic ability (so that problems can be located quickly and effectively), and increased employees productivity and commitment.

b)    Balancing adaptation and changing in the organizational culture: Although HRD systems are designed to suit the organizational culture, the role of HRD may be to modify that culture to increase the effectiveness of the organization. There always has been a controversy those who believe that HRD should be designed to suit the culture and those who believe that HRD should be able to change the culture. Both positions seem to be extreme. HRD should take the organization forward, and this can be done only it its design anticipates change and evolution in the future.

c)     Attention to contextual factors: What is to be included in the HRD systems, how is it to be subdivided, what designations and titles will be used, and similar issues should be settle after consideration, size, technology, levels of existing skills, available support for the function, availability of outside help and so on.

d)    Building linkages with other functions: Human resources development systems should be designed to strengthen other functions in the company such as long-range corporate planning, budgeting and finance, marketing, production, and other similar functions. These linkages are extremely important.

e)    Balancing specialization and diffusion of the function: Although HRD involves specialized functions, line people should be involved in various aspects of HRD. Action is the sole responsibility of the line people, and HRD should strengthen their roles.


HRD SYSTEM

November 17, 2008

The HRD subsystems or mechanism discussed so far should be thought of in isolation. They are designed to work together in an integrated system although any of them may exist in an organization that does not have an overall HRD plan. In isolation, these mechanisms do not afford the synergistic benefits of integrated subsystems. For example, outcomes of performances appraisals provide inputs for training needs, assessments, rewards, career planning, and feedback and performance coaching.  

 

PRINCIPLES IN DESIGNING HRD SYSTEMS  

Of course, HRD systems must be designed differently for different organizations. Although the basic principles may remain the same, the specific components, their relationships, the processes involved in each, the phasing, and so on, may differ from organization to organization.  

Designing integrated HRD systems requires a thorough understanding of the principles and models of human resources development and a diagnosis of the organization culture, existing HRD practices in the organization, employee perceptions of these practices, and the developmental climate within the organization. There are some principles related to focus, structure, and functioning should be considered when designing integrated HRD systems, we will discuss on each principles in our next post.

guaranteedblinds, premierinns, leadorganizer


Human Resource Information And HRD Goals

November 15, 2008

All appropriate information about employees should be stored in a central human resources data bank (usually by means of computer). This includes all basic information about each employee, training programmes attended, performance records, potential appraisals, accomplishment, etc. This data is utilized whenever there is a need to identify employees for consideration for special projects, additional training, or higher-level jobs.    

 

The Contribution of Subsystems to HRD Goals

Each of the subsystems or mechanism just defined contributes to the achievement of overall HRD goals.    

 

Performance appraisal focuses primarily on helping the individual to develop his or her present role. Potential appraisal focuses primarily on identifying the employee’s likely future roles within the organization. Training is a means of developing the individual’s personal effectiveness (e.g., through communication-skills laboratories) or developing the individual’s ability to perform his or her present job role or future job roles. Training can also strengthen interpersonal relationships (through training in communications, conflict resolution, problem solving, transactional analysis, etc.) and increase teamwork and collaboration (through management and leadership training, team-building programmes, etc.)  

Feedback and performance coaching helps the development of the individual as well as relationships. Organization development is the mechanism for developing team collaboration and self-renewing skills. Efforts to promote employee welfare and ensure the quality of work life, along with rewards, promote a general climate of development and motivation among employees.


Employee Welfare and Quality of Work Life

November 12, 2008

Employees at lower levels in the organization usually perform relatively monotonous tasks and have fewer opportunities for promotion or change. This is particularly true in developing countries. In most countries, many employees belong to trade unions. In order to maintain their work commitment and motivation, the organization must provide some welfare benefits such as medical insurance, disability insurance, and holidays and vacations.  

 

Quality-of-work-life programmes generally focus on the environment within the organization and included: basis physical concern such as heating and air conditioning, lighting, and safety precautions; additional physical amenities such as food and beverages facilities, recreation, and aesthetics; and psychological and motivational factors such as flexible work hours, freedom to suggest changes or improvements, challenging work, and varying degrees of autonomy.  

 

HRD systems focus on employee welfare and quality of work life by continually examining employee needs and meeting them to the extent feasible. Job-enrichment programmes, educational subsidies, recreational activities, health and medical benefits, and the like generate a sense of belonging that benefits the organization in the long run.


Rewards

November 7, 2008

In general sense reward meaning That which is given in return for good or evil done or received; esp., that which is offered or given in return for some service or attainment, as for excellence in studies, for the return of something lost, etc. Another meaning of reward is Compensation or remuneration for services; a sum of money paid or taken for doing, or forbearing to do, some act. If we talk with regard to service than reward means payment made in return for a service rendered

 

Rewarding employee performance and behavior is an important part of HRD. Appropriate rewards not only recognize and motive employees, but also communicate the organization’s values to the employees. In HRD systems, innovations and use of capabilities are rewarded in order to encourage the acquisition and application of positive attitude and skills. Typical rewards include certificated of appreciation, newsletter announcements, increase in salary bonuses, special privileges, and desired training.

 

Promotions are generally not considered as rewards because promotion decisions are based on appraisals of potential whereas most rewards are based on performance. Rewards may be given to individuals as well as to teams, departments, and other units within the organization.


Organization Development (OD)

October 20, 2008

We are talking Human Resource Development here. HRD is needed by any organization that wants to be dynamic and growth-oriented or to succeed in a fast-changing environment. Organization can become dynamic and grow only through the efforts and competencies of their human resources. Personnel policies can keep the morale and motivation of employees high, but these efforts are not enough to make the organization dynamic and take it in new directions. 

 

Employee capabilities must continuously be acquired, sharpened, and used. For this purpose, an “enabling” organizational culture is essential. When employees are their initiative, take risks, experiment, innovate, and make things happen, the organization may be said to have an “enabling” culture. We talked different mechanisms or subsystems of HRD in previous post. We talked performance appraisal, potential appraisal and development, feedback and performance coaching, career planning and training. Today we are going to talk about organization development (OD). 

 

This function includes research to ascertain the psychological health of the organization. This is generally accomplished by means of periodic employee surveys. Efforts are made to improve organizational health through various means in order to maintain a psychological climate that is conducive to productivity. The OD or systems experts also help any department or unit in the company that has problems such as absenteeism, low production, interpersonal conflict, or resistance to change. These experts also revamp and develop various systems within the organization to improve their functioning.  

   

guaranteedblinds, premierinns, agentswebworld


Career Planning

October 7, 2008

 

The HRD philosophy is that people perform better when they feel trusted and see meaning in what they are doing. In HRD system, corporate growth plans are not kept secret. Long-range plans for the organizations are made known to the employees. Employees are helped to prepare for change whenever such change is planned; in fact, the employees help to facilitate the change. Major changes are discussed at all levels to increase employee understanding and commitment. 

 

Most people want to know the possibilities for their own growth and career opportunities. Because managers and supervisors have information about the growth plans of the company, it is their responsibility to transmit information to their course, the plans may not become reality, but all are aware of the possibilities and are prepared for them. 

 

Training 

Training is linked with performance appraisal and career development. Employees generally are trained on the job or through special in-house training programmes. For example employees are given training how to use internet, how to surf on net. Some time such training help employee to find their partner. Interenet training helps employee to find internet dating sites where they can find dating profiles or internet dating tips which at last help him/her for internet dating. For some employees (including managers), outside training may be utilized to enhance, update, or develop specific skills. This is especially valuable if the outside training can provide expertise, equipment, or sharing of experience that are not available within the organization. 

 

In-house training programmes are developed by in-house trainers or consultants hired for the task, and periodic assessments are made of the training needs within the organizations. The effects of all training programmes are monitored and added to the data concerning training needs. Managers and employees who attend in-house or outside training events are also expected to submit proposals concerning any changes they would like to suggest on the basis of their new knowledge. The training received by employees is thus utilized by the organizations.  


Feedback and Performance Coaching

September 30, 2008

We are talking HRD in our previous post. HRD is needed by any organization that wants to be dynamic and growth-oriented or to succeed in a fast-changing environment. Organization can become dynamic and grow only through the efforts and competencies of their human resources. Personnel policies can keep the morale and motivation of employees high, but these efforts are not enough to make the organization dynamic and take it in new directions.

 

Employee capabilities must continuously be acquired, sharpened, and used. For this purpose, an “enabling” organizational culture is essential. When employees are their initiative, take risks, experiment, innovate, and make things happen, the organization may be said to have an “enabling” culture. Today we are going to talk on Feedback and Performance Coaching and Career Planning.

 

Feedback and Performance Coaching 

Knowledge of one’s strengths helps one to become more effective, to choose situations in which one’s strengths required, and to avoid situations in which one’s weaknesses could create problems. This also increases the satisfaction of the individual. Often, people do not recognize their strengths. Supervisors in an HRD system have the responsibility for ongoing observation and feedback to subordinates about their strengths and their weaknesses, as well as for guidance in improving performance capabilities. 

 

Career Planning 

The HRD philosophy is that people perform better when they feel trusted and see meaning in what they are doing. In HRD system, corporate growth plans are not kept secret. Long-range plans for the organizations are made known to the employees. Employees are helped to prepare for change whenever such change is planned; in fact, the employees help to facilitate the change. Major changes are discussed at all levels to increase employee understanding and commitment. 

 

We talk more on career planning in next post.

 


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